Archive for ‘from the magazine’

June 29, 2010

Modern Beat: The Internet and Literary Communities

This was originally published in Beatdom #5 and was written by David S. Wills. You’ll find this and all our old essays on the all new www.beatdom.com.


read more »

Advertisements
June 18, 2010

Finding the Beat Poster

May 22, 2010

Hunter S. Thompson’s Ten Best Albums of the 1960s

I’ve been busy working on an essay for Beatdom #7, titled, “Hunter S. Thompson and the Music of the 1960s.”

Anyway that knows anything about HST knows that’s a pretty broad topic, with plenty of material to study. HST was a music fiend. He once said, “I’ve been arguing for years now that music is the New Literature, that Dylan is the 1960s’ answer to Hemingway.”

My research brought me across a 1970 letter that he wrote to Rolling Stone editor John Lombardi, that contains “Raoul Duke’s” ten best albums of the 1960s…

1)     Herbie Mann’s 1969 Memphis Underground

2)     Bob Dylan’s 1965 Bringing It All Back Home (especially noted as “Mr. Tambourine Man” in his letter)

3)     Dylan’s 1965 Highway 61 Revisited

4)     The Grateful Dead’s 1970 Workingman’s Dead

5)     The Rolling Stones’ 1969 Let it Bleed

6)     Buffalo Springfield’s 1967 Buffalo Springfield

7)     Jefferson Airplane’s 1967 Surrealistic Pillow

8)     Roland Kirk’s “various albums”

9)     Miles Davis’s 1959 Sketches of Spain

10)  Sandy Bull’s 1965 Inventions

May 18, 2010

Isaac Bonan

Beatdom’s resident illustrator is Isaac Bonan – a brilliant young Frenchman whose Beat portraits have captivated our readers. He produced the cover of Issue Five, which features an aging Allen Ginsberg, and has been one of the most highly regarded images to have graced any of the pages of Beatdom throughout our history.

You can find out more about Isaac by visiting his website: www.isaacbonan.com

May 4, 2010

Tom Waits

In Beatdom #3 we brought you Tom Waits as part of our regular “Modern Beat” section. In celebration of the upcoming “Music” issue, we thought you might like to reread this essay…

Tom Waits is often viewed as an heir to the Beat Generation, and indeed he acknowledges the strong influence the Bets, and in particular Burroughs and Kerouac, have had upon his work. It’s not hard to see in Waits’ work the musical influences of the bop artists held in such importance by the Beats, as well as the lyrical significance of urban, Cold War America, a central tenant of Beat literature.

Elvis Costello quipped that around the release of ‘Swordfishtrombones’ and ‘Raindogs’, Waits shed an image that was entirely built upon the legends of the Beat Generation, and partially on those who influenced the Beats. He called it “this hipster thing he’d taken from Kerouac and Bukowski, and the music was tied to some Beat/ Jazz thing.” Indeed, many remember meeting Waits or even seeing him perform, looking as though he’d just stepped off a freight train, after years of footloose wandering…

Read More

April 23, 2010

A Guide to Kerouac’s Characters

There were some huge technical issues immediately preceding the release of Beatdom #3, and sadly the issue was never available in print. It is, however, available here to download.

In this issue we ran a long feature that named the real-life people behind the characters that were featured in Jack Kerouac’s novels.

To read the full list, please click here. (It’s free!) Below are just some of those characters.

Real Name:

William Burroughs

Bio:

Burroughs should need no brief biography printed on the pages of Beatdom. If you are reading this, then you know his story and his work. If you don’t, then no few lines is enough – buy his books and books about him.

Aliases:

Book of Dreams – Bull Hubbard
Desolation Angels – Bull Hubbard
On the Road – Old Bull Lee
The Subterraneans – Frank Carmody
The Town and the City – Will Dennison
Vanity of Duluoz – Will Hubbard

Real Name:

Lucien Carr

Bio:

Carr was central to the Beat movement. He was the embodiment of Beat – intelligent yet wild, well read but crazy. He introduced Kerouac and Ginsberg. “Lou was the glue,” Ginsberg quipped. He killed David Kammerer and sought refuge with Burroughs and Kerouac.

Aliases:

Big Sur – Julian

Book of Dreams – Julian Love

On The Road – Damion

The Subterraneans – Sam Vedder
The Town and the City – Kenneth Wood

Vanity of Duluoz – Claude de Maubris

Real Name:

Neal Cassady

Bio:

Cassady perhaps the only person on this list more famous for his most noted alias – Dean Moriarty. The legendary Holy Goof inspired so much of the Beat movement and literature, despite having no famous literary output of his own. He was Ginsberg’s lover and ‘secret hero of these poems’.

Aliases:

Big Sur – Cody Pomeray
Book of Dreams – Cody Pomeray
Desolation Angels – Cody Pomeray
The Dharma Bums – Cody Pomeray

The Subterraneans – Leroy
On the Road – Dean Moriarty
Visions of Cody – Cody Pomeray

Real Name:

Gregory Corso

Bio:

Corso is a hero here at Beatdom. Whereas most would think of the holy trinity of Beats – Kerouac, Ginsberg, Burroughs – we rate Corso among them as an equal. His life was long and tragic, but his poetry immortalised him as a great.

Aliases:

Book of Dreams – Raphael Urso
Desolation Angels – Raphael Urso
The Subterraneans – Yuri Gligoric

Real Name:

Allen Ginsberg

Bio:

As with Burroughs, if you don’t know much about Ginsberg, then perhaps you ought to go and do some more reading. This short biography could never do him justice for his role in poetry, and in the Beat Generation.

Aliases:

Big Sur – Irwin Garden
Book of Dreams – Irwin Garden
Desolation Angels – Irwin Garden
The Dharma Bums – Alvah Goldbrook
On the Road – Carlo Marx
The Subterraneans – Adam Moorad
The Town and the City – Leon Levinsky
The Vanity of Duluoz – Irwin Garden
Visions of Cody – Irwin Garden

April 20, 2010

Alene Lee

One of the great mysteries of the Beat Generation is that of Alene Lee. She is, or rather, was, an enigma. Jack Kerouac wrote about her (as Mardou Fox in The Subterraneans and Irene May in Book of Dreams and Big Sur) but the depictions he gave weren’t particularly accurate.

Lee guarded her privacy and so for many years little has been known about her. A few photographs exist, and there are some references to her in a few books (with nothing in the books specifically regarding the women of the Beat Generation), but not a lot was known until recently.

In Beatdom #4 Steven O’Sullivan wrote a fantastic essay about her, after doing some extensive research. You can read that essay here for free.

After reading the essay, Lee’s daughter contacted Beatdom and offered us some never-before read work: An essay about the life of Alene Lee, some excerpts from the writings of Alene Lee, and an entire short story by Alene Lee.

These were all published in the sixth issue of Beatdom, and comprise the largest published collection of Alene Lee material anywhere in the world.

You can read all of this in the most recent issue of the magazine, available for free here.

April 13, 2010

Crushing Kerouac

It recently came to our attention here at Beatdom that our very own Edaurdo Jones’s grandfather (whom we all call “Gramps Jones”) once played High school football against Jack Kerouac.

Naturally, we got Gramps to sit down and answer some questions about playing football against one of America’s most influential authors.

So is it true you played High school football against Jack Kerouac?

It sure is.

Do you think you could tell us about it?

It’s been many years since I took to the gridiron against Jack “Twinkle Toes” Kerouac on a blistering cold November day in 1937… but I remember it like it was yesterday. I was the starting quarterback for Punchard High in Andover, Massachusetts, and old Twinkle Toes played half back for Lowell High school. I remember the wind was blowing 50 MPH in both directions that day as we took the field to do battle like gladiators in the golden autumn sun.

They called me Billy Banana back in those days – due to the fact I’d slip past the defense men like a banana peel on a freshly waxed floor. Lowell’s defense might as well have been cooking French fries with boxing gloves on during this game. They’d zig and I’d zag in the pocket. I remember hurling a 99 yard hail Mary straight into “Sticky hands” Lynch’s numbers just before half time, tying the game at 49-49. I ran 5 of the 7 touchdown we scored myself through the 3 feet of snow that had fallen on the field in a freak blizzard that struck the area that day.

They didn’t call the game on account of snow?

Jesus no! We were real men in those days. We didn’t have all those pansy pads and stuff they wear nowadays. All we had was a leather helmet to keep our brains from flying out our ears if we got hit too hard. Snow was nothing to us.

Could you tell us little bit about Kerouac on the field.

Old Twinkle toes was a thing of beauty on the field. He’d bound over tacklers like a mountain goat. He was like a runaway locomotive once he got some momentum. He was dirty bastard in the bottom of the dog pile though. He once bit a linebacker right in the family jewels, fighting over the pigskin in the bottom of the pile. He was always gauging eyes and throwing kidney punches or giving somebody fish hooks.

That’s rather unsportsman-like conduct.

Maybe to a generation of panty wastes like you. But to real men that’s the way you play in the bottom of the pile. Victory by any means!

So you didn’t mind Kerouac’s dirty tactics?

Hell no! We respected him more for it!

I’m finding it kind of hard to believe Kerouac was such a viscous menace after reading his books.

He was a beast and a man’s man until he moved to NYC and linked up with that goddamn no-good Beatnik Allen whatever-the-hell-his-name-is and he started filling his head up with that love, peace and happiness crapola!

Let’s get back to the game. Who ended up winning?

We did, of course! Old Twinkle Toes played a good game but he was no match for us. Final score was 125-121.

Isn’t that kind of a high score for a football game?

Not when real men are playing, and not some sissy boys running around with 50 pounds of protective gear!

April 11, 2010

Beatdom #6

Beatdom always looks cool as a downloadable pdf file… and what’s more, it’s free.

But to really appreciate Beatdom’s high-quality artwork you have to see a printed copy. Take a look at these pages from “LSD 25000” by Edaurdo Jones, with illustrations by Mark Reusch:

March 27, 2010

The Beat Generation and Travel

Beatdom #6 is coming along nicely, and we’re all set for an April 2nd release. In this issue you’ll see a whole lot about travelling. We also have unpublished work by Alene Lee, and some poetry and fiction by old Beatdom favourites.

Just to whet you appetite, here’s a sample from Issue Six: an essay exploring where the Beats travelled and what they thought about travel, by Beatdom editor David S. Wills. This essay looks at the journeys taken by Jack Kerouac, Allen Ginsberg, William S. Burroughs, Gary Snyder, Gregory Corso, Lawrence Ferlinghetti, Harold Norse and Bob Kaufman.

We often look to Jack Kerouac as the great backpacker, whose On the Road is credited with sending thousands of readers literally on the road… but he certainly wasn’t the perpetual traveller many think, and the other members of the Beat Generation – whom are less well known for their journeys – travelled far more.