Posts tagged ‘Gary Snyder’

October 7, 2010

Six Gallery Reading

It’s odd. I woke up today and thought about the Six Gallery Reading. I’m not sure why I thought about it. I guess I’ve never really considered the date; only the reading and its consequences. I picked up a book about Kerouac (Jack’s Book, Gifford and Lee) to continue my reading into Kerouac’s love life, and stumbled upon a few stories about Kerouac before and during the reading. “Weird,” I thought. “I keep coming back to the Six Gallery Reading.”

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July 13, 2010

Kerouac’s Continuing Quest

Review by Arthur S. Nusbaum

Jack Kerouac’s The Dharma Bums was first published in the immediate wake of the sensation of On the Road the previous year.  It is based on Kerouac & canonical Beat poet Gary Snyder’s real-life quests & adventures, more focused & reflective (& literally uphill) under Snyder’s influence than the frantic chases back & forth across the continent with Neal Cassady that inspired & were recounted in OtR.

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May 8, 2010

Happy Birthday Gary Snyder!

One of the few remaining members of the Beat Generation, Gary Snyder was born on this day in 1930. That makes him now 80 yrs old.

Snyder is well known around the globe for his wilderness-inspired poetry, and association with Buddhism.

He studied in Japan and travelled throughout Asia, seeking enlightenment. The things he discovered have profoundly influenced his poetry.

Gary Snyder’s travels were documented in the sixth issue of Beatdom, and in issue four we “interviewed” him.

His most well known works include Riprap and Cold Mountain Poems. In 1975 he won the Pulitzer Prize for poetry.

From Modern American Poetry:

Snyder’s poetry blends America’s native past with the grandeur and detail of nature, and the mental disciplines of Zen Buddhism: his long apprenticeship in the latter has harvested a tough simplicity and freshness of expression (at its best in Cold Mountain Poems, San Francisco, 1965), a trust in the way words lead him, the faith of a traveller through an interior, whether continental or psychological. He writes in the first person, as individual in the wilderness, but the beauty and glory of the wilderness allows that individual the status of common man. He tells no tales: what he says is what he heard or saw; imagination is not for invention, but for finding the forms of expression that most perfectly mirror the world outside. For Snyder, symbol and metaphor cause a distancing from the thing itself: as Pound suggested, the thing itself is at least enough.

April 2, 2010

Beatdom #6

Beatdom #6 is finally here! Go to our website to find out more! Or buy direct from the publisher.

Beatdom Issue Six Cover

This issue has a “travel” theme. We have a long essay examining the journeys taken by each member of the Beat generation, as well as special features on Tangier (a Beat travel hotspot!) and the roaming of Hunter S. Thompson.

We have some amazing short stories by Edaurdo Jones, Brin Friesen and Omar Zingaro Bhatia, as well as a special, world-premier of “SISTERS” – a never before seen short story by Alene Lee (Mardou Fox from Jack Kerouac’s On the Road).

Finally, as a lead-in to next month’s “music” special, we have an interview with the legendary British hip-hop star, Scroobius Pip.

March 27, 2010

The Beat Generation and Travel

Beatdom #6 is coming along nicely, and we’re all set for an April 2nd release. In this issue you’ll see a whole lot about travelling. We also have unpublished work by Alene Lee, and some poetry and fiction by old Beatdom favourites.

Just to whet you appetite, here’s a sample from Issue Six: an essay exploring where the Beats travelled and what they thought about travel, by Beatdom editor David S. Wills. This essay looks at the journeys taken by Jack Kerouac, Allen Ginsberg, William S. Burroughs, Gary Snyder, Gregory Corso, Lawrence Ferlinghetti, Harold Norse and Bob Kaufman.

We often look to Jack Kerouac as the great backpacker, whose On the Road is credited with sending thousands of readers literally on the road… but he certainly wasn’t the perpetual traveller many think, and the other members of the Beat Generation – whom are less well known for their journeys – travelled far more.